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Warriors vs. Bucks Recap: Home Sweet Home

The Warriors win again despite being tremendously outrebounded.

Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports

February was brutal, and after only two of 11 games played were at Oracle Arena, the Warriors were deserving of some home court love. 11 days on the road makes for sore eyes. After tonight's 102-91 home win against the Milwaukee Bucks, they're poised to reclaim the style of play that gave us crystal clear vision in crowning the W's favorites for this year's title.

If playing their next 9 of 12 in the most familiar of surroundings can't get things back on the right track, there's a deeper issue afoot. Kerr and crew will use the comfy confines of Oracle to start the post-season push. For the Warriors, there's no better ground. They're still a league-best 25-2 at home.

However, how important is home court advantage to the Warriors? When you sport the most wins at home and on the road, it's clear this team can play anywhere they chose to. It makes the debate of home court advantage moot. It's a benefit, but not the end all-be all for the W's.

Perhaps a long stretch at home is what's needed to get Klay Thompson back on track. He ended the night with 17 points after what was his worst offensive game of the season. His splash sibling Stephen Curry closed the game with 19 points and 11 assists.

To board or not to board?

Nine offensive rebounds for Milwaukee in the first half led to the Warriors being out-rebounded again 47 to 33.

Rebounding can be an indication of passion. On most sidelines throughout the NBA you can hear head coaches scream  "who wants it more?" It's been regarded as one major ingredient to winning, and as of late the W's have moved right along without them.

But you can only get by for so long, and NBA championship teams certainly don't squeak through without those core components. Currently, the top-five rebounding teams include the Oklahoma City Thunder, Chicago Bulls, Portland Trail Blazers, Detroit Pistons and Golden State respectively. Majority of the aforementioned are post season threats. At the bottom of the pile are the Miami Heat, New York Knicks and Orlando Magic. Not many expect any of those to advance too far out of the eastern conference.

Truth is, rebounding does matter, but head coach Steve Kerr's team philosophy stands as the better agenda. Kerr believes in being elite at a few key factors, instead of pursuing greatness in many. Sure the W's could stand to grab a few more boards especially on the offensive end. Who's to say that's more important than being the league leader in scoring, three-point percentage, assists and the plus/minus category?

Point being, hitting the boards is still (and will always be) important. Good teams win when they rebound the ball. However, on the flip side bad teams win when they rebound. At the moment, the W's are hitting a variety of other chords that contribute to the win column. All of which, are worthy of keeping them in the championship conversation.