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The Golden State Warriors are more great than lucky

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There has been some trepidation on just how good these Golden State Warriors are considering just how "lucky" they've gotten through injuries and sheer missing of certain postseason teams. Well, I'm here to dissect and beat that down!

Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

It's gotten to the point in these postseason where one starts to wonder not only how great this Golden State Warriors team is but also how fortunate their road has become. When a team is so physically and blatantly dominant we weasel our way in and out of conversations, trying to remain flexible and keep the overall tangent interesting despite everything happening around it. And so it happened again as the Golden State Warriors lay the smackdown on the Houston Rockets and Stephen Curry put his stamp on becoming the next great postseason legend.

The Oklahoma City Thunder didn't make the postseason because Kevin Durant's foot never healed. Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving are hobbled as the Cleveland Cavaliers - who themselves have taken advantage of an injured Atlanta Hawks team in a terrible Eastern Conference. Tony Allen and Mike Conley Jr. fought through injuries to turn that series into a six-game gentleman's sweep. Even the New Orleans Pelicans hobbled through their sweep. And finally, the San Antonio Spurs were avoided because of the Los Angeles Clippers, who lost to the Houston Rockets behind a Chris Paul hamstring pull.

It seems like the perfect avalanche of events for the Warriors. Every single moment in this season has fallen into place for them. This is true, no argument is doing the Warriors justice at this point. They are crushing teams after a brief period of adaptation. The New Orleans Pelicans kept them at bay for a couple games before succumbing to the blue and yellow wave. The Memphis Grizzlies awakened the beast when they won two in a row and thought good times were ahead. The Houston Rockets played their best and still lost before giving up in a Game 3 annihilation.

The Spurs, Thunder, and the Clippers would likely suffer the same fate. That's where these conversations should go as the Warriors look to finish off one of the greatest runs in NBA history. I've been guilty on sitting on the other side of the fence, lamenting the loss of actual competitive series, but what if they don't happen regardless of health and play? Stephen Curry is operating on a higher plane than even the superstars on this planet right now. The defense bends then siphons your entire universe before toppling all on top of your head in a single knockout move.

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But let's shift everything back to Stephen Curry because that's what this is his postseason. As he takes down the NBA First team one by one, Anthony Davis, Marc Gasol, James Harden, and LeBron James on the horizon, there is no other human being on the planet that can replicate his feats. The Houston crowd booed him before the game started, becoming one of the few fans in the league to do so.

As the lead grew higher, a fan who berated him all game finally gave up and went to get a fist pound. That was Curry at his best, pouring on the pain at such a mind-numbing rate that a fanatical human being rooting for his hometown team lost his mind for a split second and reveled in the greatness of the MVP, begging for acceptance into his world. And like everyone else in the building pleading for their team to do something, they were in Stephen Curry's world. We all are.

Stephen Curry and the Golden State Warriors are more great than lucky through 13 games in the postseason. Injuries and the chips of the postseason has led to this draw but that's not their fault. The limbs of the Warriors are holding up for once, for one dream season that's on its way to the greatest of achievements. Some want this team to fight through more adversity. Most want to see them fall in order to get up. We're fascinated with failure and someone else's reaction to it. The Warriors are not concerned about these things.

They are impervious to the feats of mercy, of failure, and only concerned with the challenges they are mercilessly crushing in front of them.