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The Golden State Warriors Season Recap

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The Golden State Warriors are the 2014-15 NBA Champions.

Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

It started in a random November game against the ____. I'm going to be honest, I forgot the game where Steve Kerr went to the bench in an innocuous early regular season game, inserting Draymond Green at the center and running the all-wing lineup while Stephen Curry hit the pine. The offense went into the sewers, and we all knew would happen, but the defense suffocated opposing offenses at times. Brandon Rush, Justin Holiday, and Shaun Livingston were thrown in for extended minutes with the starters and the all-wing smallball lineups as throwaway experimental lineups. The Golden State Warriors season started sometime there. And the dream 67-win regular season campaign and 16-5 postseason romp ended with the Golden State Warriors going small and looming over their opponents as the largest team in the entire world.

As the season progressed, the feature stories started to pile up and this Golden State Warriors team started to become unique not only for their all-time point differential and absurd winning percentages but the way they were succeeding. They made basketball fun to watch and fun to play. Steve Kerr does not make his players run suicides or windsprints in practice, instead trying to shoot a basketball into the hoop drop-kick style. They had competitions even during games where Stephen Curry counted his free throws swished to Kerr as they went in.

The players enjoyed each other, bringing back the Coco video they were banned from making during the regular season, on the plane after winning the entire thing. The Warriors also won so many games they were able to rest players throughout fourth quarters and keeping the minutes low and therefore lessening the likeliness of injuries. They also used a state-of-the-art player monitoring service that monitored heartbeat, pulse, and body recognition. Kerr rarely played Stephen Curry in the regular season unless absolutely necessary and rested Andre Iguodala throughout until he dusted him off for the NBA Finals against an exhausted LeBron James.

The Warriors also set up a coaching staff that honed in on everyone, allowing each to flourish within their space. Alvin Gentry and Ron Adams worked as offensive and defensive coordinators, respectively. Luke Walton is an offensive mind while working with David Lee and keeping the players loose. Bruce Fraser never left Curry's side in warmups and is in a constant struggle to tweak the way Curry shoots and dribbles. Nick U'Ren, well, his name is here for a reason.

Then there is the developmental wing pieces the Warriors accrued that peaked into the super-switching defensive juggernaut they unleashed in the Finals. Shaun Livingston was signed, Andre Iguodala traded for, Klay Thompson and Harrison Barnes kept in lieu of Kevin Love offers, and Draymond Green blossoming into a wing-center hybrid monster. Over at the Santa Cruz Warriors, they are developing Justin Holiday, James Michael McAdoo and Aaron Craft isn't a slouch on defense either. They didn't stumble on this type of style, they researched, honed, created, and watched it develop in front of our very eyes.

Everything the Golden State Warriors have done this season has never been done before and might never be duplicated. That's the great thing about sports. Nothing is ever replicable to the point of reproduction.

There's no sermon thrown out by me this time, or at anytime. The Golden State Warriors, these group of players, are never going to replicate what happened in a 83-win NBA season again. And that's perfectly fine, and perfect. The 2014-15 Golden State Warriors were the most unique team in basketball this season, and maybe of all time. It doesn't necessarily make a team great but it just so happened that's what this team became. They're the champions of the world and none of this can ever be done again. There are no words left, just unique greatness.