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Marcus Thompson II beautifully depicts the Warriors trip to San Quentin

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The Warriors made their sixth annual trip to San Quentin State Prison, and Marcus Thompson II’s portrayal is a must-read

San Quentin State Prison's Death Row
A guard stands watch at San Quentin State Prison
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For six years, members of the Golden State Warriors organization have been making the trip to San Quentin State Prison. Various front office faces — including Bob Myers — and occasional players travel to the prison, where they talk with inmates, confront heartbreaking realities, and play a thrilling game of basketball.

This Warriors involvement with San Quentin is one of our favorite things about the organization, and something that Tamryn has eloquently touched on. It makes us proud to be fans.

Usually, the media that emerges from this event is simple: a few feel-good photos and some perspective-laced quotes. On their most recent trip, however, the Dubs contingency was accompanied by stellar Bay Area journalist Marcus Thompson II.

Writing for The Athletic, Thompson not only described the day in sharp and poignant detail, but provided a thought-provoking perspective that does justice to not only the event, but all of the inmates spending years behind bars. If there’s one thing you should read this week, it’s Thompson’s piece. It’s well worth the subscription cost (which is discounted for the first month).

In the meantime, here’s a snippet from the article:

One of the first realities to jump out at you is the crazy talent inside this prison. Actually, how great the view is jumps out first. The hills overlooking the yard, on a clear day, is like the view from the picture window of a house in the hills. JaVale and I were wondering whether it was torturous, to be in such a beautiful setting yet confined in these walls, or a benefit, since they get break time in fresh air right off the Bay with views that can make it easy to mentally escape.

Anyway, after the scenery, the talent stands out. It should be an obvious thing. Of course they have talents, right? They are people just like you and me. But it’s just not something you think about, which points to how successfully inmates are demonized. We are conditioned to think that prisoners are inhuman, unredeemable. Their kindness shatters those perceptions.

Outstanding work, both from the Warriors organization, and from Marcus Thompson II.