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Preview: The Warriors welcome back a Bay Area legend as they prepare to face the Miami Heat

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The newest member of the Miami Heat returns to his old stomping grounds.

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After two weeks and five games of being on the road (including a tumultuous trade deadline week that jumbled the roster), the Golden State Warriors finally returned home on Saturday to Chase Center, where they lost an unexpectedly competitive game against the Western Conference leading Los Angeles Lakers. Next up in this two-game homestand: game two of their two-game season series with the Miami Heat.


GAME DETAILS

WHO: Golden State Warriors (12-41) vs. Miami Heat (34-17)

WHEN: Monday, February 10, 2020; 7:30 pm PST

WHERE: Chase Center, San Francisco, CA

WATCH: NBC Sports Bay Area

TICKETS: Buy tickets on StubHub


With the exception of those living under the proverbial basketball rock, everyone’s pretty much aware of what transpired during the trade deadline. In regards to how it affected the Warriors: D’Angelo Russell, Jacob Evans III, and Omari Spellman were all shipped to the cold winter of Minnesota in exchange for Andrew Wiggins, a 2021 top-3-protected first-round pick (becoming an unprotected 2022 pick if it doesn’t convey), and a 2021 second-round pick. Of course, there’s also the trade of Alec Burks and Glenn Robinson III to the Philadelphia 76ers for three second-round picks.

The Warriors did not have any direct trade deadline interaction with the Heat, but a crucial trade enacted by the Heat did have an indirect effect on the Warriors.

In exchange for Dion Waiters, Justise Winslow, and James Johnson (who has since then been traded to the Timberwolves), the Memphis Grizzlies gave the Heat Solomon Hill, Jae Crowder, and a certain former Golden State Warrior who has recently made headlines due to his status as a “work”-from-home employee.

In six seasons with the Warriors, he averaged 7.3 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 1.1 steals, and 0.5 blocks, on shooting splits of .485/.342/.634. It is important to note that this player — after being acquired by the Warriors in 2013 to the tune of $48 million over four years — accepted a sixth-man role in his second year with the Warriors, which has arguably been one of the greatest contributing factors to them winning three titles in five years.

Such raw averages don’t seem all too enticing, especially for someone who is widely considered a Bay Area legend and someone who will probably eat in any Bay Area establishment for free for the rest of his life. Expect anyone who doesn’t care and will never care for the Warriors and their recent dynastic success to spit out those numbers in an effort to enrich their argument as to why this man is seemingly “overrated.”

But to Warriors fans, the Bay Area, and even those who truly know how the game of basketball works, this man will forever be credited for being one of the greatest sixth-men and “super role-players” in recent memory. He will be remembered as the first big-name free agent to have chosen to play with the Splash Brothers and Draymond Green, which served as a catalyst for Kevin Durant to eventually make his way to the Bay.

He will forever be celebrated as a member of the Death Lineup, the epitome of small-ball basketball that won the 2015 NBA Championship. Naturally, he was part of its final form — the Hamptons 5 — that swapped out Harrison Barnes for Durant and became the greatest five-man lineup in NBA history.

Throw out the raw averages, the advanced metrics, and the counting stats.

These following metrics will be the ones that will always count the most:

Welcome home, Andre Iguodala.


Wanna see Andre’s homecoming up close? Buy your tickets here via StubHub. Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links.