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Ranking all of Steph’s teammates: #101 — Chasson Randle

Technically still on the roster!

Philadelphia 76ers v Golden State Warriors Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images

On June 25, 2009, the Golden State Warriors drafted Steph Curry. Ten years and 16 days later, the Oklahoma City Thunder traded Russell Westbrook to the Houston Rockets. With that move, Curry moved to second in the NBA for longest tenure with his current team. The only player he sits behind is Udonis Haslem, though that feels like a technicality. At this point, Haslem is essentially an assistant coach for the Miami Heat, having appeared in just 43 games and played fewer than 300 minutes over the last four seasons combined.

During his time in the Bay Area, Curry has had 106 teammates who have appeared in at least one game. Some played in exactly one game, while others played in hundreds. Some never actually played in a game that Curry was active for, while others formed historically great partnerships with him.

And I’m ranking all 106, one a day, over the course of three months.

Players are ranked — and stats are shown — based only on their time as Curry’s teammate. How good/bad they were in other organizations doesn’t matter. How good/bad they were on pre-2009-10 Warriors teams doesn’t matter.

To see all of the rankings thus far, you can click on the “Ranking Steph’s teammates” tag at the top of the article.


#101 — Chasson Randle

LA Clippers v Golden State Warriors Photo by Noah Graham/NBAE via Getty Images

Games: 3 (T-100th out of 106)
Points per game: 1.7 (T-97th out of 106)
Rebounds per game: 0.7 (T-100th out of 106)
Assists per game: 1.7 (T-38th out of 106)

While Steph Curry was emerging as a superstar and a historically great player, Chasson Randle was down the freeway at Stanford, earning two-time All-Pac-12 honors, and graduating as the school’s all-time leader in points.

Five years after leaving Stanford, he was back in the Bay Area, this time sharing a locker room with Curry.

In hindsight, Randle’s stint with the Warriors is very bizarre. He’d been playing his 2019-20 season in China, with the Tianjin Pioneers. But when the coronavirus suspended the Chinese Basketball Association season, the league gave its players the opportunity to sign contracts elsewhere.

Randle ended up with the Warriors, on one of the 10-day contracts that Golden State handed out like candy after trading away six players at the trade deadline (and receiving only one in return).

It goes without saying that the stint didn’t last long. Randle had only been with the Warriors for four games when the coronavirus shut down the NBA season as well.

That time happened to overlap with Curry’s return to the court, though that was the one game that Randle didn’t play in. So while he shared a locker room and bench with Curry, he never actually shared the court with his fellow point guard.

In the three games that Randle did get to play in, he got plenty of run, as he played more than 40 minutes with the Warriors. But he didn’t have much of an impact, and he didn’t make a single field goal in those 40 minutes, earning all of his points at the charity stripe. However, where there’s bad there’s also good: Randle had plenty of ballhandling duties in his 40 minutes, yet didn’t turn the ball over a single time. That’s mighty impressive.

Perhaps Randle should be higher on this list. The Warriors won two of the three games he appeared in, which is very impressive when you consider that the team entered the season suspension with a record of 15-50. Maybe he’s the secret to winning!

But probably not. We had 40 minutes to watch Randle, and I’m guessing you didn’t spend any of them thinking, “Oh! This is definitely an NBA caliber player!”

With the Warriors 2019-20 season likely over, it seems unlikely that we’ll see Randle in a Warriors jersey again. But perhaps he’ll catch on elsewhere, and find a fifth NBA team to see the court with. After all, he’s just 27 years old, and was averaging 24.9 points per game in China.